CEU Press

Pagans and Christians in the Late Roman Empire: New Evidence, New Approaches (4th-8th Centuries)

October 24, 2017

Edited by Marianne Saghy, associate professor in the Department of Medieval Studies at CEU, and Edward M. Schoolman, assistant professor at the University of Nevada, this collection of essays inscribes itself into the revisionist discussion of pagan-Christian relations.

Quest for a Suitable Past: Myth and Memory in Eastern and Central Europe

October 24, 2017

Edited by Claudia-Florentina Dobre, director of the Center for Memory and Identity Studies,  and Cristian Emilian Ghita, this volume brings together a range of case studies of myth-making and myth-breaking in Eastern Europe from the nineteenth century to the present day. In particular, it focuses on the complex process through which memories are transformed into myths.

Muslim Land, Christian Labor: Transforming Ottoman Imperial Subjects into Bulgarian National Citizens, 1878–1939

September 12, 2017

Focusing upon a region in Southern Bulgaria, a region that has been the crossroads between Europe and Asia for many centuries, this book by Anna M. Mirkova, assistant professor at the Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Virginia, describes how former Ottoman Empire Muslims were transformed into citizens of Balkan nation-states. This is a region marked by shifting borders, competing Turkish and Bulgarian sovereignties, rival nationalisms, and migration. Problems such as these were ultimately responsible for the disintegration of the dynastic empires into nation-states.

Of Red Dragons and Evil Spirits: Post-Communist Historiography between Democratization and New Politics of History

September 12, 2017

This collection of well-researched chapters, edited by Oto Luthar, professor at the Research Center of the Slovenian Academy of Sciences, Slovenia, assesses the uses and misuses of history 25 years after the collapse of Soviet hegemony in Eastern Europe.

Isaac, Iphigeneia, Ignatius: Martyrdom and Human Sacrifice

September 12, 2017

What is the meaning of the martyr’s sacrifice? Is it true that the martyr imitates Christ? After the “one and eternal” sacrifice of Jesus why are from time to time new (and often quite numerous) sacrifices necessary? What is the underlying concept concerning the divinity? How do these ideas survive in present times?